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Contact Richard Komi

Please use the following information below to either contact the committee member or use social media to influence their position on this important issue—or to thank them for their current position.

This representative is currrently UNCOMMITTED to ranked choice voting

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For New Hampshire Citizens

If you are a citizen of New Hampshire, please call or write this committee member to show your support for this important reform.

TWEET @ RICHARD KOMI

MAILING ADDRESS

Richard Komi
Hillsborough – District 43
639 Green Street
Manchester, NH  03103-4315 

Not sure what to say?

Email and Phone Suggestions

Sample Email

Dear Representative XXXX,

My name is [your name] and I live in [NH hometown]. I support House Bill 728, the bill to bring ranked choice voting to the Granite State. Please vote the bill “Ought To Pass” on February 13th.

As a New Hampshire citizen, I am deeply concerned about the upcoming elections — particularly the presidential primary. With so many candidates running, there will be an overwhelming tendency for candidates to do “whatever it takes” to stand out in the crowd. This means a flood of negative ads, outlandish claims, and pitting citizens against citizens. After the primaries, parties will be bruised rather than emboldened.

Ranked choice voting changes these incentives. It encourages candidates to appeal to every voter, not just their “base.” With ranked choice voting, candidates may need “second choice” votes— and that means they need to appeal to voters who prefer other candidates. Candidates have to find common ground and be constructive. Negative attacks cost “second choice” votes that candidates can’t afford to lose.

It also gives all voters a voice, even voters who prefer a candidate who isn’t polling well. In the 2016 Republican presidential primary, almost 43,000 Granite State voters had their votes disregarded because their candidate got less than the party’s minimum threshold to receive Convention delegates. That was more than 15% of GOP voters who could have had their ballot reallocated to their second-choice candidate, if ranked choice voting had been in place in 2016.

This year’s Democratic primary field is likely to be just as crowded. If New Hampshire does not move to ranked choice voting, who knows how many voters’ ballots will be disregarded? Throwing away ballots because a candidate’s vote total doesn’t meet an arbitrary threshold is not the New Hampshire way of doing things.

Iowa is working to implement ranked choice voting for their caucuses. New Hampshire should do the same for our First In The Nation primary.

As Maine proved in 2018, ranked choice voting can be implemented quickly, easily and effectively —and voters love it!

We deserve to have ranked choice voting here in the Granite State. Please vote HB 728 “Ought to Pass” on February 13th.

Sincerely

[Your name]

—–

Sample Call

Hello, could I please speak with Representative XXXX?

My name is [your name] and I live in [NH hometown]. I am calling to ask you to support House Bill 728, the bill to bring ranked choice voting to New Hampshire and the presidential primary.

Can I count on you to support the bill?

[If yes]
Great. Thank you so much. Ranked choice voting in the presidential primary and state elections would make a huge difference and improve the quality of our political discourse. Please urge your colleagues to vote the bill “Ought To Pass” on February 13th.

[if unsure]
I understand that ranked choice voting is a complex issue. I’d like to tell you why I support it. With so many candidates running—especially in the presidential primary—there will be an overwhelming incentive for candidates to do whatever it takes to stand out in the crowd. This means a flood of negative ads, outlandish claims, and pitting citizens against citizens. Instead of leaving the primaries emboldened, parties will be bruised.

Ranked choice voting changes these incentives. It would encourage candidates to appeal to every voter, not just those in one’s base—for, even if a candidate wasn’t someone’s first choice, he or she could very well be someone’s second choice. Candidates would have to find common ground and be constructive.

It also ensures that everyone’s ballot counts. During the 2016 Republican presidential primary, 15% of the ballots were disregarded because the first-choice candidate didn’t meet the minimum threshold set by the RNC. Under ranked choice voting, those ballots would have been
reallocated to the voters’ second-choice candidates. Those voters—almost 43,000 of them—would still have been represented at the RNC Convention. But under our current system, voters who prefer a low-polling candidate have no reason to vote, because their ballot is going to be disregarded.

[If Committee member is a Democrat:] This is going to be a problem for the Democrats, this time around, because our field of candidates this year will be just as crowded—if not more crowded— as that of the Republicans in 2016. Who knows how many Democratic ballots will be disregarded if we don’t change the system before the 2020 primary?

Maine proved in 2018 that ranked choice voting can be implemented successfully and without much trouble—and voters love it!

For me, introducing ranked choice voting now — including for the presidential primaries — is a no-brainer. Please vote HB 728 “Ought To Pass” on February 13th.

Thank you so much for your time.

[if no]

I appreciate you being honest with me. If it’s okay with you, I would like to take a moment to explain why I support the bill and why I hope you may reconsider your opinion.

I am concerned about the upcoming presidential primaries. With so many candidates running, there will be an overwhelming incentive for candidates to do whatever it takes to stand out in the crowd. This means a flood of negative ads, outlandish claims, and pitting citizens against citizens. Instead of leaving the primaries emboldened, parties will be bruised.

Ranked choice voting changes these incentives. It would encourage candidates to appeal to every voter, not just those in one’s base—for, even if a candidate wasn’t someone’s first choice, he or she could very well be someone’s second choice. Candidates would have to find common ground and be constructive.

Ranked choice voting also ensures that everyone’s ballot counts. During the 2016 Republican presidential primary, 15% of the ballots were disregarded because the first-choice candidate didn’t meet the minimum threshold set by the RNC. Under ranked choice voting, those ballots would have been reallocated to the voters’ second-choice candidates. Those voters – almost 43,000 of them – would still have been represented at the RNC Convention. But under our current system, voters who prefer a low-polling candidate have no reason to vote, because their ballot is going to be disregarded.

[If Committee member is a Democrat: This is going to be a problem for the Democrats, this time around, because our field of candidates this year will be just as crowded—if not more crowded— than that of the Republicans in 2016. Who knows how many Democratic ballots will be disregarded, if we don’t change the system before the 2020 primary?]

Maine proved in 2018 that ranked choice voting can be implemented successfully and without much trouble—and voters love it! Moreover, both parties would benefit from this common sense reform, for the Republicans, like the Democrats, will soon inevitably face a similarly crowded primary.

For me, introducing ranked choice voting to the presidential primaries is a no brainer. Do you think that you may reconsider your position on HB 728?

For All United States Citizens

If you are a United States citizen but not a resident of New Hampshire, please don’t call the representative. But we encourage you to email the representative about why this reform would be important for America. New Hampshire plays a critical role in America’s democracy. We all have an interest in it working well.

TWEET @ RICHARD KOMI

MAILING ADDRESS

Richard Komi
Hillsborough – District 43
639 Green Street
Manchester, NH  03103-4315 

Not sure what to write?

Email Suggestions

Sample Email

Dear Representative XXXX,

My name is [your name]. I support House Bill 728, the bill to bring ranked choice voting to the Granite State. Please vote the bill “Ought To Pass” on February 13th.

As a US citizen, I am deeply concerned about the upcoming elections — particularly the presidential primary. With so many candidates running, there will be an overwhelming tendency for candidates to do “whatever it takes” to stand out in the crowd. This means a flood of negative ads, outlandish claims, and pitting citizens against citizens. After the primaries, parties will be bruised rather than emboldened.

Ranked choice voting changes these incentives. It encourages candidates to appeal to every voter, not just their “base.” With ranked choice voting, candidates may need “second choice” votes— and that means they need to appeal to voters who prefer other candidates. Candidates have to find common ground and be constructive. Negative attacks cost “second choice” votes that candidates can’t afford to lose.

It also gives all voters a voice, even voters who prefer a candidate who isn’t polling well. In the 2016 Republican presidential primary, almost 43,000 Granite State voters had their votes disregarded because their candidate got less than the party’s minimum threshold to receive Convention delegates. That was more than 15% of GOP voters who could have had their ballot reallocated to their second-choice candidate, if ranked choice voting had been in place in 2016.

This year’s Democratic primary field is likely to be just as crowded. If New Hampshire does not move to ranked choice voting, who knows how many voters’ ballots will be disregarded? Throwing away ballots because a candidate’s vote total doesn’t meet an arbitrary threshold is not the American way of doing things.

Iowa is working to implement ranked choice voting for their caucuses. New Hampshire should do the same for our First In The Nation primary.

As Maine proved in 2018, ranked choice voting can be implemented quickly, easily and effectively —and voters love it!

We deserve to have ranked choice voting in the Granite State. Please vote HB 728 “Ought to Pass” on February 13th.

Sincerely

[Your name]

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